– Major Jeffrey Hoernemann – U.S. Air Force Maj. Eric Spendlove – U.S. Air Force Maj. Luke Unrath – U.S. Air Force Capt. Terrell Brayman – U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Zachary Lavoy – U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jake Turnage – U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jacob Galliger – U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brian Johnson : “Minnesota Airman Among Those Aboard Osprey Aircraft That Crashed off Japan”

Death – Obituary – Accident and Crime News : Federal authorities have confirmed that one of the eight men on board the aircraft that crashed off the coast of Japan last week is from Minnesota. Major Jeffrey Hoernemann, a 32-year-old resident of Andover, was identified as one of the airmen in the Osprey that crashed during a training mission on November 29. Major Hoernemann was a CV-22 instructor pilot and served as the officer in charge of training. He was assigned to the 21st Special Operations Squadron, 353rd Special Operations Wing at Yokota Air Base in Japan.

As investigations continue, the United States Air Force has recovered the remains of three airmen, with another three in the process of being recovered. The search for the remains of the two remaining airmen is still ongoing. The other service members who were on board the aircraft have been identified as U.S. Air Force Maj. Eric Spendlove of St. George, Utah; U.S. Air Force Maj. Luke Unrath of Riverside, California; U.S. Air Force Capt. Terrell Brayman of Pittsford, New York; U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Zachary Lavoy of Oviedo, Florida; U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jake Turnage of Kennesaw, Georgia; U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jacob Galliger of Pittsfield, Massachusetts; and U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brian Johnson of Reynoldsburg, Ohio.

This latest crash involving an Osprey has raised safety concerns, as the aircraft has had a number of accidents in the past, including in Japan where they are utilized at U.S. and Japanese military bases. The Osprey is a unique hybrid aircraft that can take off and land like a helicopter but has the ability to rotate its propellers forward and achieve faster speeds, similar to an airplane, during flight.

Following the crash, Japan suspended flights by its Osprey aircraft and requested the U.S. military to ground all Ospreys operating in Japan, except those involved in the search operations at the crash site. However, U.S. Ospreys continue to operate in Japan, according to officials at the Pentagon.

Unfortunately, Major Hoernemann’s death marks the second loss of a Minnesota service member within a month. In November, Sgt. Cade M. Wolfe, 24, was killed in a helicopter crash in the Mediterranean Sea. Sgt. Wolfe was one of five U.S. Army Special Operations aviation soldiers who lost their lives in that tragic incident.

As the investigation into the Osprey crash continues, the focus remains on determining the cause of the accident and implementing any necessary safety measures to prevent future incidents.

Leave a Comment